United States History

US History S1
Course Description
U.S. History I is a semester course that dynamically explores the people, places, and events that
shaped early United States history. This course stretches from the Era of Exploration through the
Industrial Revolution, leading students through a careful examination of the defining moments that
paved the way for the United States of today. Students begin by exploring the colonization of the
New World and examining the foundations of colonial society. As they study the early history of the
United States, students will learn critical thinking skills by examining the constitutional foundations of
U.S. government. Recurring themes such as territorial expansion, the rise of industrialization, and
the significance of slavery will be examined in the context of how these issues contributed to the
Civil War and Reconstruction
This course is aligned with the Common Core Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,
and Technical Subjects.

Units of Study
  • The New World
  • Road the Revolution
  • War of Independence
  • A New Nation
  • Jacksonian Democracy
  • Sectionalism
  • Rising Tensions
  • The Civil War
  •  Industrialization and the West

    Course Features
  • To promote inquiry and a focus on big ideas, every lesson includes a guiding lesson question.
  • The course is organized both chronologically and thematically to help students better
    understand the context of important historical events.
  • Each lesson begins with a thought-provoking warm-up activity to engage students and activate or build on prior knowledge.
  • Lessons include in-depth profiles of significant figures and events throughout the history of the United States.
  • The course features a range of primary-source documents, including essays, speeches, maps, images, poems, and letters.
  • Reading assignments utilize the CloseReaderTM tool, which enables students to interact with the text by highlighting targeted words and phrases and adding purposeful sticky notes. Students also probe vocabulary words, investigate elements and features of the text with careful scaffolding, and benefit from auditory assistance.
  • With an increased use of multimedia, the course asks students to analyze historical artwork, political cartoons, and photography in the context of lesson themes. Students also listen to audio clips to build their listening and comprehension skills. 
U.S. History S2
 
Course Description
U.S. History II is a semester long course that examines the major events and turning points of US history from
the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer
understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped US history. As students progress
through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic
and political change on the United States’s rise to global prominence, the influence of social and political
movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments.
Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between
cultures, and between multiple perspectives.
This course is aligned with the Common Core Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,
and Technical Subjects.

Units of Study
  • Industrialization and the Gilded Age
  • Immigration and Urbanization
  • Populism and the American West
  • Progressivism and Reform
  • Imperialism and the Great War
  • The ‘20s and the Great Depression
  • World War II
  • The Rise of the Cold War
  • Civil Rights
  • Era of Cultural Change
  • The ‘70s and ‘80s
  • America in the Modern World

Course Features
  • To promote inquiry and a focus on big ideas, every lesson includes a guiding lesson question.
  • The course is organized both chronologically and thematically to help students better
    understand the context of important historical events.
  • Each lesson begins with a thought-provoking warm-up activity to engage students and activate
    or build on prior knowledge.
  • Lessons include in-depth profiles of significant figures and events throughout the history of the
    United States.
  • The course features a range of primary source documents, including essays, speeches, maps,
    images, poems, and letters.
  • Reading assignments utilize the CloseReaderTM tool, which enables students to interact with the text by highlighting targeted words and phrases and adding purposeful sticky notes. Students also probe vocabulary words, investigate elements and features of the text with careful scaffolding, and benefit from auditory assistance.
  • With an increased use of multimedia, the course asks students to analyze historical artwork, political cartoons, photography, and video in the context of lesson themes. Students listen to audio clips and watch speeches by U.S. presidents and other important historical figures to build their listening and comprehension skills.

 

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